More MS news articles for September 2002

Walking Speed Correlated With Muscle Strength In Multiple Sclerosis Patients With Sensory Loss

http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256C1C001BDE27

09/02/2002
By James Adams
A DGReview of :"Relation between walking speed and muscle strength is affected by somatosensory loss in multiple sclerosis."
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry (JNNP Online)

Walking speed is correlated with hamstring torque and quadriceps torque in multiple sclerosis patients with proprioceptive loss.

Higher contributions of the lower limb flexors and extensors in these patients suggest that muscular compensation to maintain walking speed has occurred.

These observations are relevant to multiple sclerosis rehabilitation, according to investigators from the Service de Reeducation Neuro-Orthopedique at the Hôpital Rothschild in Paris, France.

The investigators performed gait evaluations and isokinetic tests on 20 multiple sclerosis patients with unaided walking.

Patients were divided into two groups based on whether or not they experienced somatosensory loss. Twelve patients were included in the sensory-pyramidal group and eight in the pyramidal only group. Ten healthy controls were also included in the study.

Results showed that, overall, walking speed was reduced and related to hamstring torque in the multiple sclerosis patients compared with the controls.

In the patient group with sensory loss, gait speed showed a strong correlation with hamstring torque and quadriceps torque. In the group without sensory loss, there was little or no such correlation.

Peak hamstring and quadriceps torques were similar between the two patient groups.

The investigators conclude that somatosensory loss affects the relationship between walking speed and muscle strength in patients with multiple sclerosis.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2002; 73(3): 313-315 "Relation between walking speed and muscle strength is affected by somatosensory loss in multiple sclerosis."
 

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