More MS news articles for Sep 2001

Patients With Benign And Non-Benign Multiple Sclerosis Suffer Fatigue Equally

http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256ACA0069437D?OpenDocument&id=4BBC5FBCA1357AB5852569D400017E30&c=Multiple%20Sclerosis&count=10

09/21/2001
By Veronica Rose

A DGReview of :"Fatigue is not associated with raised inflammatory markers in multiple sclerosis"
Neurology

There is no apparent direct relationship between markers of inflammatory disease activity and the pathogenesis of fatigue in multiple sclerosis, according to British researchers. It was noted, however, that patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis suffered less fatigue than their counterparts with the relapsing-remitting form of the disorder.

The poorly understood pathogenesis of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) prompted neurologists in the departments of neurochemistry, neurology and neurorehabilitation in London's Institute of Neurology, Queen Square to test the relationship between fatigue and inflammatory disease activity.

Fatigue, assessed by the Fatigue Questionnaire Scale (FQS) and Krupp's Fatigue Severity Scale (KFSS) was correlated with several inflammatory markers in 38 patients with MS. Sixteen had 16 relapsing-remitting (RR) of which seven had benign MS. Nine had secondary progressive (SP) and 13 had the primary progressive form of the disorder.

Markers nominated by researchers included daily urinary neopterin excretion, a marker of interferon-b- activated macrophage activity, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) levels. Urinary neopterin excretion was measured daily for two weeks.

Researchers "found no correlation between either urinary neopterin excretion (CRP) or slCAM-I and the fatigue score." There did find patients whose serum C-reactive protein level was raised had a higher KFSS, but not FQS, than those with normal CRP levels (KFSS, 50± 8 vs 41 ± 14, FQS 13 ± 4 vs 11±5, p =NS).

Patients with the relapsing-remitting and secondary-progressive MS were found to be more liable to suffer fatigue than their counterparts with the primary progressive form of the disorder when assessed with the FQR (RR=12.5 [4 to 23] vs SP= 13 [8 to 18] vs PP =9 [7 to 14].

Patients with benign and non-benign multiple sclerosis both became equally fatigued.

Neurology 2001 Vol 57 pp 676-681 "Fatigue is not associated with raised inflammatory markers in multiple sclerosis"
 

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