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More MS news articles for October 2003

An MRI study of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in Italian multiple sclerosis patients

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/searching/ExpandTOC/ingenta?issue=infobike://arn/ms/2003/00000009/00000005&index=8

Multiple Sclerosis, 1 October 2003, vol. 9, no. 5,  pp. 467-471(5)
Grimaldi L.M.E.[1]; Pincherle A.[2]; Martinelli-Boneschi F.[3]; Filippi M.[4]; Patti F.[5]; Reggio A.[5]; Franciotta D.[6]; Allegra L.[7]; Comi G.[3]; Blasi F.[7]
[1] Department of Neurosciences, AUSL 2 Caltanissetta, Via G. Cusmano 3, 93100 Caltanissetta, Italy & Neuroimmunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 58, 20100, Milan, Italy [2] Neuroimmunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 58, 20100, Milan, Italy [3] Neurological Department, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 58, 20100, Milan, Italy [4] Neuroimaging Research Unit, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 58, 20100, Milan, Italy [5] Neurological Department, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95100, Catania, Italy [6] IRCCS Neurological Institute 'C. Mondino Foundation', Via Palestro 3, 27100, Pavia, Italy [7] Institute of Respiratory Diseases, University of Milano, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore di Milano, Via F. Sforza 35, 20100, Milan, Italy

We amplified sequences of the Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) major-outer membrane protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 23 of 107 (21.5%) relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and two of 77 (2.6%) patients with other neurological diseases (OND) (P=0.00022).

CP+ patients showed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of more active disease (P=0.02) compared to CP– MS patients and tended to have an anticipation of age at disease onset (32.3±12 versus 28.5±10 years; P= ns) causing a longer disease duration (7.5±5 versus 4.4±4 years; P=0.016) at the time of clinical evaluation.

These findings, although indirectly, suggest that CP infection of the central nervous system (CNS) might affect disease course in a subgroup of MS patients.