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More MS news articles for November 2003

The interleukin-1 gene family in multiple sclerosis susceptibility and disease course

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/searching/ExpandTOC/ingenta?issue=infobike://arn/ms/2003/00000009/00000006&index=1

Multiple Sclerosis, 1 December 2003, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 535-539(5)
Veen T.H-v.[1]; Schrijver H.M.[2]; Zwiers A.[3]; Crusius J.B.A.[3]; Knol D.L.[4]; Kalkers N.F.[2]; Laine M.L.[5]; Barkhof F.[6]; Peña A.S.[3]; Polman C.H.[2]; Uitdehaag B.M.J.[7]
[1] Department of Neurology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [2] Department of Neurology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [3] Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [4] Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [5] Department of Basic Dental Sciences ACTA, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [6] MS-MRI Centre, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands [7] Department of Neurology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of presumed autoimmune origin with a considerable polygenic influence.

We have previously observed that a specific allele combination in genes of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family influenced the progression rate in MS.

We have considerably expanded our patient population (492 MS patients and 228 controls).

In the present study, we investigated the role of the IL-1A-889, IL-1B-511, IL-1B+3953 and IL-1RN VNTR gene polymorphisms in MS.

In addition, we performed preliminary analyses on longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data.

We found no associations between the polymorphisms and susceptibility to MS or clinical features.

In addition, we observed no significant effect of the polymorphisms on brain or lesion volumes, Based on our data and those from the literature, one can conclude that there is currently no evidence to support a role for the IL-1 genes in MS.