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More MS news articles for November 2003

MRI/MRS of corpus callosum in patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/searching/ExpandTOC/ingenta?issue=infobike://arn/ms/2003/00000009/00000006&index=4

Multiple Sclerosis, 1 December 2003, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 554-565(12)
Ranjeva J.P.[1]; Pelletier J.[2]; Confort-Gouny S.[1]; Ibarrola D.[1]; Audoin B.[3]; Le Fur Y.[1]; Viout P.[1]; Chérif A.A.[4]; Cozzone P.J.[1]
[1] Centre de Résonance Magnétique Biologique et Médicale - UMR CNRS No. 6612, Medical School of Marseille, France [2] Centre de Résonance Magnétique Biologique et Médicale - UMR CNRS No. 6612, Medical School of Marseille, France and Department of Neurology, Timone University Hospital of Marseille, France [3] Centre de Résonance Magnétique Biologique et Médicale - UMR CNRS No. 6612, Medical School of Marseille, France and Department of Neurology, Timone University Hospital of Marseille, France [4] Department of Neurology, Timone University Hospital of Marseille, France

Atrophy of corpus callosum (CC) related to axonal loss has previously been observed in patients at the early stage of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS).

Atrophy increases with the progression of the disease.

Nevertheless, no data concerning the onset of atrophy of CC are currently available.

The purpose of this study is to determine if damage in callosal tissue was present at the earliest stage of MS, in a subgroup of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS (CISSMS), fulfilling the dissemination in space criteria according to McDonald.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques were applied to measure CC volume, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), mean diffusivity (MD), N-acetyl aspartate/choline-containing compounds (NAA/Cho) ratio, N-acetyl aspartate/total creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio and Cho/Cr ratio inside the CC of 46 CISSMS patients and 24 sex- and age-matched controls.

No atrophy of CC was observed in the CISSMS group.

CC of patients was characterized by decreased MTR and increased MD.

No change in the NAA/Cr ratio was observed while the NAA/Cho ratio decreased and Cho/Cr ratio increased in the splenium and the central anterior part of CC.

These abnormalities were present in patients with, but also without, macroscopic lesions inside the CC.

Our results indicate that diffuse structural and metabolic changes, which may be interpreted as representing predominantly myelin pathology, occur in the CC at the earliest stage of MS before any atrophy is detected.