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More MS news articles for November 2003

Chronic pain in a large community sample of persons with multiple sclerosis

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/searching/ExpandTOC/ingenta?issue=infobike://arn/ms/2003/00000009/00000006&index=11

Multiple Sclerosis, 1 December 2003, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 605-611(7)
Ehde D.M.[1]; Gibbons L.E.[2]; Chwastiak L.[3]; Bombardier C.H.[1]; Sullivan M.D.[3]; Kraft G.H.[1]
[1] Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA [2] Department of Psychosocial and Community Health, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA [3] Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA

Introduction:

This study examined the prevalence, intensity, interference, and biopsychosocial correlates of pain in a large community-based sample of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Methods:

Mail surveys were returned by 442 members of the King County (WA) MS Association.

Average pain intensity, pain-related activity interference, depressive symptoms and severity of MS were assessed.

Results:

Forty-four percent reported persistent, bothersome pain in the three months prior to completing the survey.

Participants with pain reported an average pain intensity rating of 5.2 (SD = 2.3) on the 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as could be) scale.

Twenty-seven percent reported severe pain (score of 7-10), while 51% of those with pain rated the interference of their pain with daily activities as none to minimal.

Twenty percent reported severe interference in activities as a result of pain.

In multivariate modeling, MS illness severity, marital status, and self-ratings of overall health were significantly associated with pain-related interference with activities.

Conclusions:

Approximately a fourth of this sample described having a chronic pain problem characterized by severe pain intensity and significant pain-related interference with activities.

Disability due to pain may be more important than previously recognized for the MS population.