More MS news articles for Nov 2001

Clinical Trial of Teriflunomide Seeking Participants at Nine Sites

http://www.mssociety.ca/en/research/PT011026.htm

October 26, 2001
Medical Update Memo

Summary

Volunteers are needed to find out if a modified form of a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis would be effective in relapsing-remitting MS. The clinical trial of oral teriflunomide (taken by mouth) has just begun at nine MS clinics across Canada. Study principal investigator is Dr. Paul O'Connor, director of the MS Clinic, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto. It is sponsored by Aventis Inc. The arthritis drug is known as Arava, however, the formulation of the drug being used in the MS study is considerably different. Please see eligibility criteria and contact information below.

Details

Volunteers are needed to find out if a modified form of a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis would be effective in relapsing-remitting MS. The clinical trial of oral teriflunomide (taken by mouth) has just begun at nine MS clinics across Canada. Study principal investigator is Dr. Paul O'Connor, director of the MS Clinic, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto. It is sponsored by Aventis Inc. The arthritis drug is known as Arava®, however, the formulation of the drug being used in the MS study is considerably different.

Studies of teriflunomide in laboratory animals with the MS-like disease called experimental allergic encephalomyelitis have been promising and have led to this small Phase II study to determine whether teriflunomide can be used safely in people with MS and whether it has any impact on the disease. It is believed that teriflunomide works primarily on modulating the responses of T-cells within the immune system.

A total of 180 people with relapsing-remitting MS who meet study criteria are required for the study. The study is double-blinded (neither the participants nor their care team will know who is on active treatment) and placebo controlled. Participants will receive either 7 mg or 14 mg of oral teriflunomide or an inactive placebo for 36 weeks with MRI scans, blood tests and neurological examinations every six weeks. After this period, participants will be offered the choice of taking the low or high dose of teriflunomide in the extension phase of the study.

Potential side effects

The version of the drug used for rheumatoid arthritis is considered safe and generally well tolerated. Since teriflunomide has not been used before in people with MS, study participants will be monitored carefully for the development of significant side effects.

Eligibility criteria

To be eligible, participants must:

Participating clinics

For more information, contact the clinic research coordinator:

  • Dalhousie MS Research Unit, Halifax: Pauline Weldon -- 902 422-7817
  • Centre Hospitalier Afflilié - Enfant Jésus, Quebec City: Research Coordinator - 418 649-5756
  • Montreal Neurological Hospital: Marie Josée Rho -- 514 398-8497
  • Notre Dame Hospital, Montreal: Renée Dubois -- 514 890-8000, ext. 25173
  • Ottawa Hospital: Dawn Carle -- 613 737-8899, ext. 71496
  • St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto: Esther Viira -- 416 864-5176
  • London Health Sciences Centre: Jane Lesaux -- 519 663-3456
  • Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary: Sandra McGuinnes -- 403 670-4244; Marites DeJesus -- 403 670-4250
  • Vancouver Hospital: Aileen McGregor: 604 822-1764
Disclaimer

The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada is an independent, voluntary health agency and does not approve, endorse or recommend any specific product or therapy but provides information to assist individuals in making their own decisions.
 

© 2001 Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada