More MS news articles for June 2002

Multiple sclerosis: a study of CXCL10 and CXCR3 co-localization in the inflamed central nervous system

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12044976&dopt=Abstract

J Neuroimmunol 2002 Jun;127(1-2):59-68
Sorensen TL, Trebst C, Kivisakk P, Klaege KL, Majmudar A, Ravid R, Lassmann H, Olsen DB, Strieter RM, Ransohoff RM, Sellebjerg F.
The MS Clinic, Department of Neurology, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup Hospital, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark

T-cell accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) is considered crucial to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS).

We found that the majority of T cells within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartment expressed the CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR), independent of CNS inflammation.

Quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed continuous accumulation of CXCR3+ T cells during MS lesion formation.

The expression of one CXCR3 ligand, interferon (IFN)-gamma-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10)/CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 10 was elevated in MS CSF, spatially associated with demyelination in CNS tissue sections and correlated tightly with CXCR3 expression.

These data suggest a critical role for CXCL10 and CXCR3 in the accumulation of T cells in the CNS of MS patients.