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More MS news articles for February 2003

Development of the key behaviors change inventory: A traumatic brain injury behavioral outcome assessment instrument

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12601661&dopt=Abstract

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003 Feb;84(2):277-284
Kolitz BP, Vanderploeg RD, Curtiss G.
Departments of Psychology (Kolitz, Vanderploeg) and Psychiatry (Vanderploeg, Curtiss), University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; the James A. Haley Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Vanderploeg, Curtiss), Tampa, FL; and the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program (Vanderploeg, Curtiss), Tampa, FL.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the development and initial validation of a neurobehavioral outcome measure, the Key Behaviors Change Inventory (KBCI), for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

DESIGN:

Scale construction and development, and validity study.

SETTING:

Large state university and postal survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

Seventy-five volunteer undergraduate students and 25 volunteer collateral informants of individuals with TBI participated in the item-analysis phase.

Thirty members of the Brain Injury Association and 20 members of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society rated both an identified patient and an age- and gender-equated control in the validation phase.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Content validity was examined through expert panel item sorts.

Scale internal consistencies were examined with the Cronbach alpha.

Construct validity was examined by comparing scale elevations between controls and 2 neurologic groups.

RESULTS:

Item-analysis procedures resulted in 8 scales of 8 items each: inattention, impulsivity, unawareness of problems, apathy, interpersonal difficulties, communication problems, somatic difficulties, and emotional adjustment.

Internal consistency reliability coefficients ranged from.82 to.91.

Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant (P</=.001) differences in scale elevations among TBI, multiple sclerosis (MS), and control groups.

The TBI and MS groups scored significantly higher than the control group on all scales; a subset of KBCI scales discriminated between the 2 neurologic groups.

CONCLUSION:

The KBCI was both sensitive and specific to typical behavioral changes after TBI, thus supporting its usefulness in rehabilitation settings.

Cross-validation and development of a normative database are future steps necessary in its development.