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More MS news articles for August 2003

Safety of immunisation and adverse events following vaccination against hepatitis B

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12904102&dopt=Abstract

Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2003 May;2(3):225-31
Duclos P.
Department of Vaccines and Biologicals, Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals, World Health Organization, Geneva, 20 Avenue Appia, CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.

Hepatitis B vaccines (HBVs) are composed of highly purified preparations of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg).

An adjuvant, either aluminium phosphate or aluminium hydroxide, is added to the vaccines, which are sometimes preserved with thiomersal.

In placebo-controlled studies, common side effects other than local reactions were reported no more frequently among vaccine recipients than among individuals receiving a placebo.

A number of controversial adverse events have, however, been purported to be associated with HBVs, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes, demyelinating diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis [MS]), chronic fatigue syndrome, and more recently, lymphoblastic leukaemia.

In addition, the safety of the thiomersal and aluminium contained in the vaccine has also been under close scrutiny.

These issues have been reviewed by a number of country-specific or international independent review committees such as that of the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS).

Upon review of the scientific evidence, none of the serious allegations have so far been confirmed.

On the contrary, scientific evidence has accumulated to disprove many of the allegations.

In particular, the IOM committee has concluded that the evidence favoured rejection of a causal relationship between HBV administered to adults and incident MS or MS relapse.

Whilst it is important to continue monitoring some of the safety issues, there is no evidence to suggest that the WHO should consider altering its recommendation that all countries should have universal infant and/or adolescent immunisation programmes.

The risks of hepatitis B vaccination are only theoretical in comparison with clear benefits in terms of cirrhosis and cancer prevention, and the HBV remains one with an excellent safety profile.