More MS news articles for August 2000

New Drugs Offer Hope For Those With M.S.

August 02, 2000

INTRODUCTION
Multiple sclerosis, or M.S., is a disorder of the central nervous system that affects more than a million people. But there's new hope for M.S. patients, thanks to several drug treatments under review by the FDA.

DEAN EDELL, M.D.
"Nick Choulos has had a full life."

NICK CHOULOS/LIVES WITH M.S.
"I was able to go to school, get married and raise children, have a
profession."

DEAN EDELL, M.D.
"He's also lived with M.S. since the age of 19."

NICK CHOULOS/LIVES WITH M.S.
"I was lucky: after three attacks, it disappeared."

DEAN EDELL, M.D.
"But Nick's M.S. has recently worsened."

NICK CHOULOS/LIVES WITH M.S.
"My legs have sort of given out, the strength in my legs. I'm relying more on a wheelchair."

DEAN EDELL, M.D.
"Multiple sclerosis has two distinct phases: relapsing/remitting, where an initial M.S. attack happens, then goes away. In M.S. secondary progressive phase, a patient experiences more disability in addition to attacks. "Up until now, patients in the second phase of M.S. have only had drug therapies to reduce symptoms like stiffness and bladder urgency, but nothing to actually slow the disease itself. But now, the FDA is considering new drugs that show promise in halting the disease's progression."

DONALD GOODKIN, M.D./M.S. SPECIALIST
"I anticipate over the next three to six months we will have at least one, and maybe two new treatments for patients with secondary progressive M.S. A reason to have more hope."

DEAN EDELL, M.D.
"In European trials, the drugs betaseron and mitozantrone slowed progression of disability and reduced attacks in patients with secondary progressive M.S.

NICK CHOULOS/LIVES WITH M.S.
"I hope and pray they come across and do help these people out, because these people are fighters, the ones that I've met that have M.S., they struggle everyday with it."
 

FDA action on the two new M.S. drugs is expected within the next three to six
months.