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More MS news articles for April 2003

A randomized clinical trial of a wellness intervention for women with multiple sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12690582&dopt=Abstract

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003 Apr;84(4):467-76
Stuifbergen AK, Becker H, Blozis S, Timmerman G, Kullberg V.
University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Austin, TX (Stuifbergen, Becker, Timmerman, Kullberg); and University of California, Davis, CA (Blozis).

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of a wellness intervention program for women with multiple sclerosis (MS) on health behaviors and quality of life (QOL).

DESIGN:

Randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

Community setting in the southwestern United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

Convenience sample of 113 women with physician-confirmed MS (mean age, 45.79y).

INTERVENTIONS:

The 2-phase intervention program included lifestyle-change classes for 8 weeks, then telephone follow-up for 3 months.

Participants were followed over an 8-month period.

Main Outcome Measures: A series of self-report instruments to measure barriers, resources, self-efficacy for health behaviors, health promotion behaviors, and health-related QOL were completed at baseline, 2 months (after the classes), 5 months (after telephone follow-up), and at 8 months.

Principal outcomes measures were health-promoting behaviors (scores on the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II) and QOL (scores on the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36] scales).

RESULTS:

Hierarchical linear modeling techniques revealed a statistically significant group by time effect for self-efficacy for health behaviors, health-promoting behaviors, and the mental health and pain scales of the SF-36.

CONCLUSION:

These data provide initial support for the positive effects of wellness interventions to improve health behaviors and selected dimensions of QOL for women with MS.